Re-appropriating the ancient monastic practice of lectio divina: A contemplative pedagogocal method of inquiry to experience wisdom embedded in the humanities

Mary Keator, Salve Regina University

Abstract

The subject of this research is the re-appropriation of the ancient Christian contemplative practice of lectio divina, which developed and evolved in the monastic schools between the 2nd and 12th centuries as a way to search for and experience wisdom embedded in sacred and literary texts. This dissertation examines how this ancient practice can be adapted in an age of advanced technology as a way for educators to reclaim the contemplative dimension of education by supporting the students' subjective exploration of learning. This dissertation gives an historical overview of the four movements of the monastic method of lectio divina: lectio (reading), meditatio (interpreting) oratio (responding) and contemplatio (experiencing wisdom), a personal contemporary adaption of each movement in a secular Humanities course, followed by some insights and challenges for educators interested in incorporating these practices into their Humanities course. Central to this dissertation is the concrete application of the lectio divina method as a viable pedagogical tool to guide students slowly and methodically through a literary text and into a subjective experience of Wisdom in their ongoing search for what it means to be human in age of advanced technology.^

Subject Area

Religion|Literature|Higher education

Recommended Citation

Keator, Mary, "Re-appropriating the ancient monastic practice of lectio divina: A contemplative pedagogocal method of inquiry to experience wisdom embedded in the humanities" (2016). Doctoral Dissertations (Off Campus access). AAI10116216.
http://digitalcommons.salve.edu/dissertations/AAI10116216

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